How to Control Asian Tiger Mosquito Populations In Your Yard - Scientific Plant Service Skip Navigation

How to Control Asian Tiger Mosquito Populations In Your Yard

scientific plant service Asian Tiger mosquito

Learn how you can determine if the Asian Tiger mosquito has begun breeding in your yard.

Many Maryland residents may have thought that the peak of mosquito season was over. Mother Nature had other plans. The recent winds of Hurricane Ida have transported swarms of Asian Tiger mosquitoes (Aedes albopictus) up from the Gulf of Mexico. These swarms make it uncomfortable and a bit riskier to sit outside and enjoy the low humidity and blue skies of late summer. If you have recently noticed a surge of mosquitoes in your yard, read on to learn whether you have an infestation of the Asian Tiger mosquito and what you can do to eliminate those populations. 

How to Identify Asian Tiger Mosquitoes

Asian Tiger mosquitoes are noticeable by a few factors regarding their appearance and behavior: 

  • They are often aggressive and may follow you into your house or car
  • They are most often out during the day, between dawn and dusk
  • They are dark black with a white stripe running down their back

Asian Tiger mosquitoes have a short flight range, just about 100 to 200 yards. If you notice them, they are most likely breeding on your property. Fortunately, there are things you can do to reduce an infestation. 

How to Eliminate Mosquito Breeding Grounds

Asian Tiger mosquito populations display a strong preference for breeding in small, man-made containers. If these containers sit in shady, damp areas, they are even better. To eliminate these infestations, you must first walk around your house, lawn, patio, and garage to spot anything that retains water. Even the smallest amount of standing water can be a breeding area. If you find any water, dump the water and throw away the item or store it under something that doesn’t collect water. 

These mosquitoes remain at ground level and love hiding under natural ground covers like English Ivy and shrubs. They can also hide under decks, stairwells, and in crawl spaces. If the water is stagnant and filled with sediment or organic matter, the mosquitoes will be especially drawn to it. There are many places that homes may have which are ideal for the Asian Tiger mosquito. Look for the mosquitoes in these locations: 

  • Corrugated drain pipe off of downspouts
  • Children’s toys, especially if plastic
  • Portable basketball stands
  • All containers, including buckets, pails, water bottles, trash cans, recycling containers, storage totes
  • Tarps that hold water
  • Tires
  • Flower pots
  • Plastic chairs, tables, outside furniture
  • Birdbaths

The sooner you eliminate these breeding spots, the better off you will be. Being proactive is the best defense. The Asian Tiger mosquito has a lifespan of about two weeks, so you should stop noticing new mosquitoes after the breeding spots are remedied.

However, if you cannot remove the breeding ground or nothing seems to work, you should immediately contact a qualified inspector or pest control expert. 

Scientific Plant Service Is Your Go-To Source In Landscape Healthcare

Scientific Plant Service, located in Baltimore, is a privately owned corporation, chartered in Maryland in 1957 by Frank J. Burke. We started as a full-service Arborists specializing in the care of shade trees and ornamental shrubs, but today we are a Lawn Care company that is a huge part of the community. From aquatic environments and snow management to deer and mole control, SPS has services tailored specifically for your lawn and landscape.

We offer services in Maryland, Washington, DC, and Virginia, including: Harford, Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Howard, Anne Arundel, Montgomery, Prince Georges, Talbot, Queen Anne’s, Calvert counties in MD, as well as Loudoun County, Fairfax County, Arlington, Alexandria, and Falls Church in VA. For more information, contact us online, or call us at 410-321-0970. Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest!

This entry was posted on Friday, September 10th, 2021 at . Both comments and pings are currently closed.